Tales from the Front Line ... and other stories

Details

November 2020 - April 2021

Tales from the Front Line ... and other stories documents the contribution of Black workers at the front line of the Covid-19 crisis, using verbatim interviews to create a lasting historical record.

★★★★  The Guardian

★★★★ The Stage

★★★★ iPaper

★★★★★ The Upcoming


Overview

The Covid-19 pandemic presents a challenge to Black key and front-line workers, especially after the Windrush Scandal and global Black Lives Matter movement. Now, many are demanding that a changed society must emerge from it. 

In the second Tales from the Front Line instalment, we face head on Black front line workers' concerns about working in an environment where, in comparison to March 2020, customers have an increasingly blasé attitude to health and safety measures as well as dwindling respect for them.

Exposing the exhaustion of Black front line workers, and their glimmering hope for a better future, Tales from the Front Line ... and other stories uses verbatim interviews to explore the historic Covid-19 crisis and its seismic impact on those at the front line of the pandemic.

See the films 

  • Arifa Akbar, The Guardian

    ★★★★ “Miniature character studies, rich in insight and individual detail. They reveal a person and a life.”

  • Sam Marlowe, iPaper

    ★★★★ “… intimate, thoughtful, and nakedly honest ... Impossible not to listen; impossible to look away.“

  • The Stage

    ★★★★ " ... an example of the way theatre can be used to educate and promote understanding."

  • Part 4

    The fourth 'Tales from the Front Line' film sees Ann Akin (I May Destroy You; Strike series), directed by Jessica Mensah, and sharing the words of a supermarket assistant whose job has led her to consider the judgements she has made about others’ career choices as she becomes conscious of
    entitled shoppers’ perceptions of her. From the fear inspired by panic-buying to the sudden appreciation from shoppers who gained awareness of the essential role of supermarket workers, the pandemic has been a rollercoaster. She finds the power in holding onto positivity and gratitude to keep going through each day.

    Tales from the Front Line - Episode 4: Shop Assistant

  • "... the way you conduct yourself, the way you appreciate people; you should at all times show empathy, show kindness."

  • Part 3

    Directed by David Gilbert, the third film stars Kwame Bentil (Get Luke Lowe; Summerlake) and shares the words of a train dispatch worker who worries that his work puts his elderly father at risk of infection. Disappointed by the lack of respect given by passengers even as he adapts to help them and tries to enforce the rules to keep them safe, he finds himself frustrated by the baseless assumptions he encounters every day.

    Tales from the Front Line - Episode 3: Railway Worker

  • "It took weeks before they did anything. Not everyone is treated equally."

  • Part 2

    The second film sees Sapphire Joy (J’Ouvert, Theatre503; Casualty), directed by Kwame Asiedu, share the words of an NHS Recovery Worker. Frustrated by the racial bias in the medical treatment of Black people, she finds herself further exhausted by performative gratitude during the pandemic, when there was little public outcry at the government’s failure to give NHS workers pay rises.

    Tales from the Front Line - Episode 2: NHS Mental Health Worker

  • “It’s a lot of work being black in Britain ... you can’t always be shouting back”

  • Part 1

    The first film stars Jo Martin (Doctor Who; Casualty), directed by Michael Buffong, who shares a teacher’s experience of trying to keep themselves and their pupils safe after decades of budget cuts. It explores how new conversations opened up in the wake of the global Black Lives Matter movement, and the challenges of supporting students’ education when nothing was certain anymore.

    Tales from the Front Line - Episode 1: Schoolteacher

  • “You could tell the kids were worried because they went quiet ... and then there was George Floyd.”

  •             We want to know what you think

  • The Tales from the Front Line interviews were a space for the Black workers to share their experiences, their concerns and their hopes for the future.

  • Black artists and creatives have then used the testimonies to create six dramatised pieces of work using music, movement, photography and soundscapes to convey the story. These will be released episodically: the first two films were made available in November 2020, a second instalment was released in February, with a third instalment due later in Spring 2021.

  • George Collins, A Younger Theatre

    ★★★★ " ... strikingly beautiful – but the anger they inspire is deep."

  • Michael Buffong, Artistic Director and Joint CEO, Talawa Theatre Company

    “Tales from the Front Line creates a historical record of the contribution of Black workers at the front line of the Covid-19 crisis, demanding change from society. These truth-telling stories reflect real-life experiences which can't be ignored, and do so in ways that are artistically and creatively rich.”

  • Please support the work of Black Minds Matter UK

    Black Minds Matter UK understand the effects of racial discrimination across this country, the resilience it takes to fight this on a daily basis, and the triggering effects of seeing violence against Black people in our media. 

    Treating mental health must be a priority in the fight for equality and welfare of black people in the UK. That's why we are asking you to help us support the work of Black Minds Matter UK. 

    Please donate to Black Minds Matter UK, using the button below.

    Thank you.

  • Thank you

    We are enormously grateful for the generosity of many people, especially the Black front line workers who shared their experiences, thoughts and hopes with us. We are also grateful for the support we have received from Arts Council England and Croydon Council’s Culture Relief Fund. 

    Thank you to everyone who has helped make Tales from the Front Line ... and other stories possible.

    Supported by Arts Council England and Croydon Council’s Culture Relief Fund

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